Balancing Work and Family Life for Entrepreneurs

Balancing Work and Family Life for Entrepreneurs

Working hard at growing your businesses, my fellow entrepreneurs? While consumers are going wild this holiday weekend and the summer cash is flowing, there is a serious concern to be addressed. "OUR FAMILY LIVES!! "According to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, the average American worked 33.4 hours per week in the professional and business services sector between January 2016 to March 2018. I know you’ve been working hard at it but there needs to be a balance in our lives to dedicate to the unconditionally devoted cheerleaders that lead us to victory! Wanting to understand this a bit more, I did some interviews…

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“I have flexibility to do what I want,”

-Brad Edgar

 

“I have flexibility to do what I want,” says Brad Edgar, a project manager for a prominent architectural firm, “I make it work and go.” Brad works an average of 35 hours a week and spends about 11 hours a week with family. Diana, his wife of seven years, agrees. As an independent contractor involved in network marketing herself, time management is key to maintaining their family life. Two military spouses,

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LaTonya Ireland and Kami McManus, experienced additional issues with balancing their businesses with the rigors of the military lifestyle. Both women worked anaverage of 55 hours per week, struggling to ensure their spouses could focus on the task ofdefending our nation’s freedom. Kami – a licensed childcare provider – states, “You have to beextremely intentional about making time for your marriage, your family, and yourself.” Sheensures the safe care of five to seven children for 10-11 hours a day, noting time management to be her biggest concern. LaTonya – an occupational therapist with only 24 hours per week togive to her family – continues, “You have to make time no matter what!”

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“You have to make time no matter what!”

 

Given that the 33.4 hours per week for the last two years might be the statistical standard, most of the entrepreneurs I interviewed [to include myself] have dedicated much more time to the growth of their businesses. Becca Stotts, office manager for emerging staffing company, notes, “Balancing the needs of my subordinates…and those I care about above my own…is difficult.”

Time management is the concern that is at the crux of the balancing act.Tyler Nals, author, finds that the balancing act isn’t about the numbers. “The best thing I can do is spend quality time with my son,” notes the authority, “I…just revert back to who I am naturally.” I agree emphatically that an imbalance on either side creates issues in the long run,which can be detrimental.

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Check out More on Tyler…

With the hours we put towards the growth of our businesses, it is of vital importance to make time to grow with our families and with ourselves. I implore you to establish boundaries between work and family and take a strong look at where you stand. Employ the made towards that growth in your endeavors to your families and to yourself – business is an adventure, but only one facet of your livelihood!

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